Monday, June 05, 2006

Casting on (and off) for Tempting II

(How bizarre...I thought I just posted this using the "Blog This" link, but when I went to edit it, the post wasn't there. So sorry if it appears twice!)
One piece of advice for knitting Tempting II: Make sure your row gauge is spot on for the top shoulder band. If it isn't, the band will pull the otherwise perfectly fitted sweater away from the shoulders, because you're knitting one row onto each stitch of the sweater's top line as you make it. If your gauge is off, knit it with smaller needles, whatever you need to get the gauge right, or even snug. The band holds the sweater on your shoulders and keeps the silhouette of the sweater, so it's an integral piece of the sweater's structure, not just a decoration!
And (this was the edit I wanted to add) yes, you could totally make it without the buckle. When you get to the part of the pattern that begins the band, it tells you to begin knitting several inches of the band first. Start by knitting as little of that as possible--maybe just a few rows for ease of attaching the ends and of working the band onto the body of the sweater?--then immediately begin working the band onto the body. (That four or five inches or whatever it is is what becomes the tail you work through the buckle when you're finished.) Then you're just knitting the rows of the band onto the sweater body as you go around, picking up the live stitches off the circular that you've used to knit the body, effectively casting them off in the process. When you've picked up and knitted all of the body stitches, you've knitted the band all the way around and you're finished. You'd just cast off the band and be done. Where the instructions tell you to attach the band, you could instead sew the two ends of the band together like any unfinished seam, or add a button if that were your style (though in this case it sounds like you're looking for less detail, not more).
If you're going for no buckle, I might decrease a row before starting the band as well as knitting the band on smaller needles, just to be sure the shoulders would stay up. I'm not sure how much additional security the buckle actually provides--it doesn't have fastener or anything, so I wouldn't guess much.
Oh, and for those of you looking for buckles but unsure where to get them or what a Tri-Glide looks like, I found mine at LesBonRibbon.com. Great prices and selection and very fast and excellent service as well.

5 comments:

Robin said...

Thanks for the info on where to get the buckle - I was going to ask! Not sure if I want to make it with or without though...

Rae said...

Agreed on the buckle. I'm not such a fan and may try without. But I don't know how it would work exactly. I guess I'd just sew the band down where the buckle is supposed to be?

Rae said...

I just finished reading your post - I should have read all the way through before posting my last comment.

Thanks for such detailed instructions! I actually started knitting this sweater when it was first suggested, and I'm almost to the arms now. I'll definitely post my notes to the group and consider making it again (second time around always works better for me).

Robin said...

Yeah, I'm having trouble wrapping my head around how the buckle works and what you would do without it too. I'm also trying to see if I find any really cool buckles that would motivate me to put it on there...

Aura said...

I just tied the ends loosely and let them hang; works fine.

I know several knitters who have had problems getting the top to stay up, and the band to lay flat... I ended up doing several decrease rows before the final k2tog, k1 row, and then I attached the band on every row (on WS, you p2tog). IT lays very flat and is still a nice boatneck, but also bra-friendly.

I got this advice in the knitty coffeeshop, and I do have some pics on my blog.

Happy knitting!